Home » Articles posted by bt28@duke.edu

Author Archives: bt28@duke.edu

TIP Alumni Website

TIP Alumni Website

Book Club

Book Club

Academic 411

Academic 411

Ready for College

Ready for College

Opportunity Guide

Duke Programs

National/International Programs

Online Programs

Weekend Programs

Summer Programs

Mentorship Programs

COVID-19 Resources

For students

For parents

For educators

Gifted Today

Gifted Today

Teachers Workshop

Teachers Workshop

Research Bibliography

Program Model

  • Olszewski-Kubilius, P., Makel, M. C., Plucker, J. A., Subotnik, R. F. (2017). Universal principles of learning require unique applications for gifted students. Canadian Psychology, 58, 271-275. doi: 10.1037/cap0000118
  • Plucker, J. A., Rinn, A. N., & Makel, M. C. (Eds.) (2017). From Giftedness to Gifted Education: Reflecting Theory in Practices. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
  • Steenbergen-Hu, S., Makel, M. C., Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2016). What one hundred years of research says about the effects of ability grouping and acceleration on K-12 students’ academic achievement: Findings from two second-order meta-analyses. Review of Educational Research, 86, 849-899. doi:10.3102/0034654316675417
  • Holahan, W., & Sawyer, R. N. (1986). The counseling and consultation of TIP’s summer residential program. Roeper Review, 9, 108-113.
  • Lee, S., Matthews, M. S., & Olszewski-Kubilius, P. (2008). A national picture of talent search and talent search educational programs. Gifted Child Quarterly, 52, 55-69.
  • Makel, M. C., Lee, S. Y., Olszewski-Kubilius, P., & Putallaz, M. (2012). Changing the pond, not the fish: Following high ability students across different educational environments. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 778-792. doi:10.1037/a0027558.
  • Pleasants, R., Stephens, K. R., Selph, H., & Pfeiffer, S. I. (2004). Incorporating service-learning into leadership education: Duke TIP’s Leadership Institute. Gifted Child Today. 27, 16-23.
  • Putallaz, M., Baldwin, J., & Selph, H. (2005). The Duke University Talent Identification Program. High Ability Studies, 16, 41-54.
  • Sawyer, R.N. (1984). The Duke University educational programs for brilliant youths. Roeper Review, 7, 103-109.
  • Sawyer, R.N. (1985). The early identification and education of brilliant students: The Duke model. The College Board Review, 135, 2-8.
  • Sawyer, R.N. (1986). Intellectual challenges and emotional support of the precocious child. Journal of Counseling and Development, 64, 593-597.
  • Stocking, V. B. (1998). “What I did on my vacation”: Summer options for gifted students.Education for the Gifted and Talented, 82, 93-100.

Program Evaluation

  • Brounstein, P.J., Holahan, W., & Dreyden, J. (1991). Change in self-concept and attributional styles among academically gifted adolescents. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 21, 198-218.
  • Brounstein, P.J., Holahan, W., & Sawyer, R. (1988). The expectations and motivations of gifted students in a residential academic program: A study of individual differences. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 11, 36-52.
  • Li, Y., Alfeld, C., Kennedy, R. P., & Putallaz, M. (2009). Effects of summer academic programs in middle school on high school test scores, course-taking, and college major.  Journal of Advanced Academics, 20,404-436.
  • O’Keefe, P. A., Ben-Eliyahu, A., & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. (2012). Shaping achievement goal orientations in a mastery-structured environment and concomitant changes in related contingencies of self-worth. Motivation and Emotion.
  • Petersen, N.M., Brounstein, P.J, & Kimble, G.A. (1988). Evaluation of college level coursework for the gifted adolescents: An investigation of epistemological stance, knowledge gain and generalization. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 12, 46-61.
  • Schiel, J. (1998). Academic benefits in high school of an intensive summer program for academically talented seventh graders. ACT Research Report Series, 98-4. PDF
  • Schiel, J. L., & Stocking, V. B. (2001). Benefits of TIP summer residential program participation, as reflected by subsequent academic performance in high school. In N. Colangelo & S.G. Assouline (Eds.),Talent development IV: Proceedings from the 1998 Henry B. and Jocelyn Wallace National Research Symposium on Talent Development (pp. 435-438). Scottsdale, AZ: Gifted Psychology Press. 

Talent Identification

  • Olszewski-Kubilius, P., Makel, M. C., Plucker, J. A., Subotnik, R. F. (2017). Universal principles of learning require unique applications for gifted students. Canadian Psychology, 58, 271-275. doi: 10.1037/cap0000118
  • Plucker, J. A., Rinn, A. N., & Makel, M. C. (Eds.) (2017). From Giftedness to Gifted Education: Reflecting Theory in Practices. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
  • Makel, M. C., Wai, J. Peairs, K., & Putallaz, M. (2016). Sex differences in the right tail of cognitive abilities: An update and cross cultural extension. Intelligence, 59, 8-15. doi: 10.1016/j.intell.2016.09.003
  • Makel, M. C., Kell, H. J., Lubinski, D., Putallaz, M., & Benbow, C. P. (2016). When lightning strikes twice: Profoundly gifted, profoundly accomplished. Psychological Science. doi:10.1177/0956797616644735
  • Makel, M. C., Putallaz, M., & Wai, J. (2012). Teach students what they don’t know but are ready to learn: A commentary on “Rethinking giftedness and gifted education.” Gifted Child Quarterly, 56, 198–201.
  • Stephens, K., & Karnes, F. A. (2000). State definitions for the gifted and talented revisited. Exceptional Children, 66, 219-238.
  • Stocking, V. B., & Goldstein, D. (1992). Course selection and performance of very high ability students: Is there a gender gap? Roeper Review, 15, 48-51.
  • Wai, J., Cacchio, M., Putallaz, M., & Makel, M. C. (2010). Sex differences in the right tail of cognitive abilities: A 30-year examination. Intelligence, 38, 412-423.

Characteristics of Gifted Youth

  • Olszewski-Kubilius, P., Makel, M. C., Plucker, J. A., Subotnik, R. F. (2017). Universal principles of learning require unique applications for gifted students. Canadian Psychology, 58, 271-275. doi: 10.1037/cap0000118
  • Peters, S. J., Matthews, M. T., Rambo-Hernandez, K., Makel, M. C., & Plucker, J. A. (2017). Should millions of students take a gap year? Large numbers of students start the school year above grade level. Gifted Child Quarterly, 61, 229-238. doi: 10.1177/0016986217701834
  • Plucker, J. A., Rinn, A. N., & Makel, M. C. (Eds.) (2017). From Giftedness to Gifted Education: Reflecting Theory in Practices. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
  • Zabaneh, D., Krapohl, E., Gaspar, H. A., Curtis, C., Lee, S. H., Patel, H., … & Breen, G. (2017). A genome-wide association study for extremely high intelligence. Molecular Psychiatry, 1-7. https://www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/mp2017121a.pdf
  • Zabaneh, D., Krapohl, E., Simpson, M. A., Miller, M. B., Iacono, W. G., McGue, M., … & Breen, G. (2017). Fine mapping genetic associations between HLA region and extremely high intelligence. Scientific Reports, 7, 41182. DOI: 10.1038/srep41182
  • Gaultney, J.F., Bjorklund, D.F., and Goldstein, D. (1996). To be young, gifted, and strategic: Advantages for memory performance. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 61, 43-66.
  • Jarosewich, T., and Stocking, V. B. (2003). Medication and counseling histories of gifted students in a summer residential program. The Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 91-99.
  • Luthar, S.S., Zigler, E., and Goldstein, D. (1992). Psychosocial adjustment among intellectually gifted adolescents: The role of cognitive-developmental and experiential factors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 361-375.
  • Makel, M.C., Li, Y., Putallaz, M., & Wai, J. (2011). High-ability students’ time spent outside the classroom. Journal of Advanced Academics, 22, 720-749.
  • Makel, M. C., Snyder, K., Thomas, C., Malone, P., & Putallaz, M. (2015). Gifted students’ implicit beliefs about intelligence and giftedness, Gifted Child Quarterly, 59, 203-121.
  • Makel, M. C., Wai, J., Putallaz, M., & Malone, P. S. (2015). The academic gap: An international comparison of the time allocation of academically talented students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 59, 177-189.
  • Matthews, M.S. (2004). Leadership education for gifted and talented youth: A review of the literature. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 28, 77-113.
  • Matthews, P. H., and Matthews, M. S. (2004). Heritage language instruction and giftedness in language minority students: Pathways toward success. The Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 15, 50-55.
  • Mayer, J.D., Caruso, D.R., Zigler, E., Dreyden, J. (1989). Intelligence and intelligence-related personality traits. Intelligence. 13, 119-133.
  • Miller, D., & Wai, J. (2015). The bachelor’s to PhD STEM pipeline no longer leaks more women than men: A 30-year analysis. Frontiers in Psychology: Developmental, 6, 37.
  • Peairs, K.F., Eichen, D., Putallaz, M., Costanzo, P. R., and Grimes, C. L. (2011). Academic giftedness and alcohol use in early adolescence. Gifted Child Quarterly, 55, 95-110.
  • Spain, S.L., Pedroso, I., Kadeva, N., Miller, M.B., Iacono, W.G., McGue, M., Stergiakouli, E., Smith, G.D., Putallaz, M., Lubinski, D., Meaburn, E.L., Plomin, R. & Simpson, M.A.  (2015). A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence, Molecular Psychiatry, 1-7.
  • Wiley, J., and Goldstein, D. (1991). Sex, handedness and allergy: Are they related to academic giftedness? Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 14, 412-422.

Self Concept

  • Brounstein, P.J., Holahan, W., & Dreyden, J. (1991). Change in self-concept and attributional styles among academically gifted adolescents. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 21, 198-218.
  • Makel, M. C., Lee, S. Y., Olszewski-Kubilius, P., & Putallaz, M. (2012). Changing the pond, not the fish: Following high ability students across different educational environments. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 778-792. doi:10.1037/a0027558.
  • Marsh, H. W., Plucker, J. A., & Stocking, V. B. (2001). The Self-Description Questionnaire II and gifted students: Another look at Plucker, Taylor, Callahan, and Tomchin’s (1997) “Mirror, mirror on the wall.” Educational and Psychological Measurement, 61, 976-996.
  • Plucker, J., & Stocking, V. (2001). Looking outside and inside: Self-concept development of gifted adolescents. Exceptional Children, 67, 535-548.
  • Stocking, V. B., & Plucker, J. A. (2001). Evaluation of the internal/external frame of reference model for gifted adolescents. In N. Colangelo & S.G. Assouline (Eds.), Talent development IV: Proceedings from the 1998 Henry B. and Jocelyn Wallace National Research Symposium on Talent Development (pp. 439-443). Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press, Inc.

Gender

  • Makel, M. C., Wai, J. Peairs, K., & Putallaz, M. (2016). Sex differences in the right tail of cognitive abilities: An update and cross cultural extension. Intelligence, 59, 8-15. doi: 10.1016/j.intell.2016.09.003
  • Malin, J. & Makel, M. C. (2012). Gender differences in gifted students’ advice on solving the world’s problems. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 35, 175-187.
  • Miller, D., & Wai, J. (2015). The bachelor’s to PhD STEM pipeline no longer leaks more women than men: A 30-year analysis. Frontiers in Psychology: Developmental, 6, 37.
  • Wai, J., Cacchio, M., Putallaz, M., & Makel, M. C. (2010). Sex differences in the right tail of cognitive abilities: A 30-year examination. Intelligence 38, 412-423.
  • Goldstein, D., & Stocking, V.B. (1994). TIP studies of gender differences in talented adolescents. In K.A. Heller & E.A. Hany (Eds.), Competence and responsibility: The third European conference of the European Council for High Ability (held in Munich, Germany), October 11-14, 1992, (Vol.2; pp.190-203). Seattle: Hogrefe & Huber.
  • Stocking, V. B., & Goldstein, D. (1992). Course selection and performance of very high ability students: Is there a gender gap? Roeper Review, 15, 48-51.
  • Luthar, S.S., Zigler, E., & Goldstein, D. (1992). Psychosocial adjustment among intellectually gifted adolescents: The role of cognitive-developmental and experiential factors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 361-375.
  • Dreyden, J.I., & Gallagher, S.A. (1989). The effects of time and direction changes on the SAT performance of academically talented adolescents. Journal for the Education of the Gifted,12, 187-204.

Achievement and Motivation

  • Peters, S. J., Matthews, M. T., Rambo-Hernandez, K., Makel, M. C., & Plucker, J. A. (2017). Should millions of students take a gap year? Large numbers of students start the school year above grade level. Gifted Child Quarterly, 61, 229-238. doi: 10.1177/0016986217701834
  • Li, Y., Alfeld, C., Kennedy, R. P., & Putallaz, M. (2009). Effects of summer academic programs in middle school on high school test scores, course-taking, and college major. Journal of Advanced Academics, 20, 404-436.
  • Linnenbrink-Garcia, L., Patall, E. A., & Messersmith, E. E. (2012). Antecedents and consequences of situational interest. British Journal of Educational Psychology. [Keywords: Achievement and Motivation]
  • Matthews, M. S., & Farmer, J. L. (2008). Factors affecting the Algebra I achievement of academically talented learners. Journal of Advanced Academics, 19, 472-501.
  • Matthews, M. S., & McBee, M. T. (2007). School factors and the underachievement of gifted students in a talent search summer program. Gifted Child Quarterly, 51, 167-181.
  • Matthews, M. S. (2006). Gifted students dropping out: Recent findings from a Southeastern state. Roeper Review, 28, 216-223.
  • O’Keefe, P. A., Ben-Eliyahu, A., & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. (2012). Shaping achievement goal orientations in a mastery-structured environment and concomitant changes in related contingencies of self-worth. Motivation and Emotion.
  • Wai, J., & Putallaz, M. (2011). The Flynn effect puzzle: A 30-year examination from the right tail of the ability distribution provides some missing pieces. Intelligence, 39, 443-455.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2011.07.006

Testing

  • Brounstein, P.J., & Holahan, W. (1987). Patterns of change in scholastic aptitude test performance among academically talented adolescents. Roeper Review, 10, 110-116.
  • Jarosewich, T., & Stocking, V. B. (2003). Talent search: Student and parent perceptions of out-of-level testing. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 137-150.
  • Makel, M. C., Kell, H. J., Lubinski, D., Putallaz, M., & Benbow, C. P. (2016). When lightning strikes twice: Profoundly gifted, profoundly accomplished. Psychological Science. doi:10.1177/0956797616644735
  • Malone, P.S., von Brock, A., Brounstein, P.J., & Shaywitz, S.S. (1991). Components of IQ scores across levels of measured ability. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 21, 15-28.

Research Bibliography

Methods in Research

  • Pridemore, W. J., Makel, M. C., & Plucker, J. A. (2018). Replications in criminology and the social sciences. Annual Review of Criminology. doi: 10.1146/annurev-criminol-032317-091849
  • Makel, M. C. & Plucker, J. A. (Eds). (2017). Toward a More Perfect Psychology: Improving Trust, Accuracy, and Transparency in Research. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Plucker, J. A., Makel, M. C., Matthews, M. S., Peters, S. J., & Rambo-Hernandez, K. E. (2017). Blazing new trails: Strengthening policy research in gifted education. Gifted Child Quarterly, 61, 210-218. doi: 10.1177/0016986217701838

 

Just the Facts

Just the Facts

Duke TIP has prepared a series of research-based hand-outs that explain the core issues affecting gifted education programs in America today. All of these hand-outs are concise, easy-to-understand, and backed by credible research. Use this information to advocate for your child or gifted program, and help us spread the word about the need for more fact-based approaches to gifted education policies.

Above-grade-level testing

Above-level tests are an important tool for assessing gifted students. They let educators and parents identify relative strengths as well as more accurately assess what material students have already learned.  Download the PDF File for Above Grade Level Testing.

Academic acceleration

For decades, research has consistently shown that allowing students to accelerate academically in order to help match their learning environment with their learning needs can lead to numerous benefits for both the student and for society. Download the PDF File for Academic Acceleration.

School versus summer growth

High-achieving students have similar summer and school-year academic growth rates—indicating that they may not be receiving adequate challenge in school. Download the PDF File School versus summer growth.

Selection criteria

Academically gifted programs should have selection criteria that match the skills needed to succeed in the program. Download the PDF File Selection Criteria.

How many students are underchallenged?

Researchers estimate that large numbers of US students are not receiving the challenge they need. Download the PDF File underchallenged students.

Student age and learning needs

Students do not have the same learning needs just because they are the same age, and that can create problems for teachers. PDF Handout Student Age and Learning Needs.

12 facts about gifted education

Check out this summary of twelve research-based facts on gifted education. PDF Handout Research Facts.

If you are looking for the sources of the facts used in these hand-outs, review them here.

Navigator and Insights

Navigator

Insights