News

Monday, March 21, 2016
2016 GRC Ceremony

Nearly 56,000 academically talented seventh grade students nationally took above grade level college entrance exams through the Duke University’s Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) in late 2015 and early 2016.

Program: 
  • 7th Grade Talent Search
Thursday, August 27, 2015
A boy looking on during a recognition ceremony

Although "intelligence" and "giftedness" are often used interchangeably to describe the potential of academically talented students, a new study by Duke TIP researchers shows that students do not necessarily view the two terms as interchangeable.

Monday, June 15, 2015
Matthew Makel

The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) announced today that one of its researchers has won a 2015 Mensa Education and Research Foundation Award for Excellence in Research, which is given internationally for outstanding research on intelligence, intellectual giftedness, and related fields. Gifted Education Research Specialist Matt Makel received the prestigious Mensa award for his study, "Changing the Pond, Not the Fish: Following High-Ability Students Across Different Educational Environments," published in the Journal of Educational Psychology.
 

Friday, May 1, 2015
A boy sitting in class

More than 6,400 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students took ACT’s EXPLORE® test for eighth graders through the Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) in late 2014 and early 2015.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015
A boy holding his medal giving a thumbs up

The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) is honoring academically-talented seventh graders for their exceptional scores on the ACT or SAT. Duke TIP’s 7th Grade Talent Search identifies students across the United States who have scored at or above the 95th percentile on a grade-level achievement test. As part of the program, these academically talented students take above-level college-entrance exams to learn more about their abilities. Duke TIP then hosts annual recognition ceremonies to honor the seventh graders who scored the highest on these ACT or SAT exams. This year, out of 64,481 participants nationally, 22,236 students have been invited to attend state recognition ceremonies and 2,230 students have been invited to Duke TIP’s Grand Recognition Ceremony.

Saturday, April 18, 2015
A teacher talking with her student in a classroom

Academically talented students from India spend substantially more time on academics compared to academically talented U.S. students, especially when it comes to STEM subjects, according to a new study led by Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) gifted research specialist Matt Makel. These findings are especially relevant given current concerns that, in STEM education, the U.S. may be falling behind in comparison to other (often Asian) countries on international tests. Unlike previous comparisons of international test scores, the new study explored the context in which such scores are achieved.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015
A boy thinking during class

Nearly 56,000 academically talented seventh grade students took college entrance exams through the Duke University’s Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) in late 2014 and early 2015.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015
An empty desk in a classroom with students in the background

A major grant by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation will allow the Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) to register high-ability, low-income students in TIP’s renowned academic programming for gifted scholars at no cost to their families. The grant supports a special TIP program called Project Launch, which engages low-income scholars in a variety of academic opportunities. These activities include TIP’s CRISIS summer program, mentored online courses, above-grade level testing to better evaluate each student’s academic strengths, a book club, and special email notifications to parents that help them advocate for and support their children.

Friday, January 9, 2015
A group of people walking along a walkway lined with trees

Duke University’s Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) announced today that it will expand its popular CRISIS program for gifted students to Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas.